what are these: ( )

how about these: [ ]

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and last, these: { }

@chr I also call them curly brackets but "braces" is the more official name so I voted for that cos I know that's what it should be

@chr theyre all parens

normal parens: ()
bolded parens: []
cursive parens: {}

@chr
Some wolf's opinion:
() = parens/parentheses
[] = brackets [possibly square brackets if disambiguation is needed]
{} = braces [curly brackets is acceptable, but braces preferred]

@IceWolf @chr
() are parentheses. “round brackets” is weird but acceptable and will be understood.
[] are square brackets. “brackets”, unqualified, probably means these.
{} are curly braces. “braces”, unqualified, means these.
<> are angle brackets or alligator brackets.

The four of these, collectively, are the brackets provided by ASCII. (Unicode provides even more.)

@moonbolt When I was a young fox learning basic arithmetic, the teacher insisted that > and < were alligators that wanted to eat the biggest number and therefore stood facing it with mouth wide open.

@IceWolf @chr

@azure @IceWolf @moonbolt @chr my teacher told me the same, but I always interpreted it as an arrow pointing to the smaller number

@moonbolt @IceWolf @chr imo
these are angle brackets: ⟨⟩
these are "pointy" or "sharp" brackets: <>
I've never heard an "official-sounding" name for pointy brackets even when I do lots with XML and HTML and in my context the first ones are DEFINITELY angle brackets.

@thufie @IceWolf @chr <> aren't called any kind of brackets by XML or ASCII; they call them less-than and greater-than signs.

@chr What would you call ⟨ ⟩, out of curiosity?

@Rosemary i don't think i've seen that symbol enough to have a name for it spring to mind

<>. on the other hand, when used as grouping symbols, i would call "angle brackets". i don't know enough of their common names to make a poll about it though.

@chr When we see the term angle brackets, ⟨ ⟩ is what comes to mind.

@chr They do tend to be used pretty much only in the fields of physics and linguistics though. For entirely different things, naturally.

@chr@scalie.business i want to vote in the polls but all of the answers except like two are correct

@InspectorCaracal maybe i should have made them multiple choice lol

i wanted people to take a stance tho

@moonbolt i didn't forget, i just don't know enough about what they're commonly called to make a poll about it

@chr Actually in Swedish it's fairly common that we call them "måsvingar" which translates to "seagull wings".

@moonbolt @chr

Introverts.

Might still be lewd, but they are very shy about it.

@chr I don't know if to translate llaves as keys or as wrenches.

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